Forthcoming

August 14, 7:45 am BN Aziz reviews the anti-Israel boycott action in the US Congress. WBAI, 90.5 fm

July 10, Tune in at 7:45 am  Nepal just completed its first election in 20 years for nationwide local admin posts.

3, 7:45 am, 99.5 fm, WBAI Radio. "All politics is local":-- the hard work of using local news resources.

June 26, 7:45 am WBAI Radio We ask why is there no anti-war movement in the US? And: “Martyrdom”—an archaic phrase but a concept we need to think about today.

June 19 7:45 am On the 50th anniversary of the 1967 war, and Israel's seemingly unstoppable political, diplomatic and territorial march, it’s remarkable that the Palestinian voice is heard at all.

June 12, Monday 7:45 am. The dilemma of 'moderate Amercian Muslims; following ReclaimNY , a child of Steve Bannon and Robert Mercer.

May 1, Workers Day, 7:45 am WBAI 99.5 fm. BN Aziz highlights the rise of the 'gig economy'

April 24, 7:45 WBAI 99.5 fm. A check on our progress as American Muslims; and, Lynne Stewart: the Peoples' Lawyer. 

See Ramzy Baroud's assessment on how our Muslim community misuses celebrity Muslims as surrogates for their own stuggle.

 

Monday April 17 7:45 am, 99.5 fm on WBAI Radio, NYC. Why is there essential no anti-war movement in the USA?

April 10;  A critical look at media coverage of the US assault on Syria; and an update on ReclaimNY.

B. Nimri Aziz weekly radio commentary on events around the globe and in the USA. Listen in at 99.5 fm, or online www.wbai.org where we are livestreamed.

"We are more alike than we are different"

  Maya Angelou

March 8, Women's Day Radio Specials  10-11 am on WJFF Radio, 90.5 fm, and 11:am on WBAI, 99.5 New York: B. Nimri Aziz interviews director Amber Fares about her new film "Speed Sisters" and exerpts from 2009-2010 interviews with professional women in Syria, Nadia Khost and Nidaa Al-Islam.

 

 

As a Black writer, I was expected to accept the role of victim. That made it difficult in the beginning to be a writer.      James Baldwin

I often feel that there must have been something that I should’ve done that I didn’t do. But I can’t identify what it is that I didn’t do. That’s the first difficulty. And the second is, what makes you think you’re it?   

         Harry Belafonte, activist and singer at 89

 

It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble; It's what you know for sure that just ainst so.

Mark Twain

 

You can't be brave if you've only had wonderful things happen to you.

Mary Tyler Moore

 

 You can’t defend Christianity by being against refugees and other religions

Pope Francis:

 

"I don't have to be what you want me to be". Muhammad Ali

"The Secret of Living Well and Longer: eat half, walk double, laugh triple, and love without measure"  attributed to Tibetan sources

Recent audio posts include interviews with Rumi interpreter Shahram Shiva, London-based author Aamer Hussein, South African Muslim scholar, professor Farid Esack, and Iraqi journalist Nermeen Al-Mufti's brief account of Kirkuk City history. Your comments on our blogs are always welcome.

 

 

 

Articles

Algerian Agricultural Experiments in the Sahara
2006-04-01
by Barbara Nimri Aziz
Soufi from the River, Soufi from the Sand

Who else but we built our domes?
Who but we preened these poems?
To whom else do sand dunes yield
A land aglow with golden jewel?
Come,
See a rare pride.
Come,
See how this sand breathes sand;
How these brown arms
Render harsh earth so supple.
How these brown arms
Lift away trouble.
Come.
See, from sun’s hot rays of El-Souf
light enters any dark crevice.

Bubakar Murad
(Translation: Rachida Mohammedi)

At the entrance to a private experimental farm near the city of El-Oued in the Algerian sahara stands a modest statue of an early settler of this oasis: the ‘rammaal’. He is neither a camel trader nor a herdsman, although El-Oued is home to both. Rimal means sand in ‘arabic’, and rammaal is the humble farmer and sand porter whose muscle and plodding determination made El-Oued’s early date palms grow. Far removed from today’s mechanized farming, this figure, weighed down by the sack of sand on his back, is an evocative regional symbol. Far to the north of ElOued, Algeria’s hills and plains overlook the Mediterranean, from Tlemsen on the western border with Morocco to Annaba bordering Tunisia in the east. Covered by rich loam and fed by seasonal rains, they are Algeria’s most productive agricultural regions, but they comprise only a sliver of a country more than three times the size of Texas. After Sudan, Algeria is the largest country in Africa.

Almost 90 percent of Algeria’s area lies south of the Atlas mountains, where the land ranges from arid stony plain to shifting seas of desert sand. In many of these arid regions, however, the potential for agricultural production exists: they overlie one of the world’s underground water sources, the Continental Intercalaire. This 600,000-square-kilometer (231,600 sq. mi) confined aquifer spreads beneath much of Algeria, Tunisia and Libya; it is second only in size only to the Ogallala aquifer of the central United States.

For decades, the full agricultural potential of Algeria’s inland expanses have been overlooked in favor hydrocarbon exploration, and gas and oil today account for some 60 percent of the Algerian government’s revenues and one-third of Algeria’s gross domestic product. Much of Central and southern Algeria, populated by barely three million of the country’s estimated 32 million people, has remained hardly more than a scattering of oases.

But that is changing. Rural development is receiving increasing official support as the Algerian government recognizes that arid-region production not only helps move Algeria toward food independence, but also helps check the expansion of the desert and staunch the flow of young people from rural to urban areas of the country.

El-Oued is an obvious place for the expansion of agriculture.

For the complete article with photographs go to: www.saudiaramcoworld.com

Browse all articles



Find Us on Facebook
Find Us on Facebook

When you learn, teach; when you get, give.

quoted by poet Maya Angelou

Paul Laurence Dunbar

Tahrir Diwan

a poem.. a song..
poem "These Words", by Lisa S. Majaj
poem from the chapbook These Words

See poems and songs list

Flash
poems
poem Qur'an Surat Al-Qadr
from 'Approaching The Qur'an' CD, male reciter

See audio list

Book review
Michio Kaku, scientist and talk-radio host's
The Future of the Mind
reviewed by BN Aziz.

See review list

Tahrir Team

Aydin Baltaci
Read about Aydin Baltaci in the team page.

See Tahrir Team

WBAI Online

Select Links



Fatal error: Call to a member function Close() on a non-object in /home/content/a/l/r/alrawi/html/fullarticle.php on line 73