Forthcoming

June 26, 7:45 am 99.5 fm, WBAI Radio Regular daily news tells us how the US is at war,—yet, there’s no sign of an anti-war movement in the US. Commentator B Nimri Aziz asks: Why the silence?  Then, we reflect on “martyrdom”—an archaic phrase but a concept we need to think about today.

June 19 7:45 am On the 50th anniversary of the 1967 war, and Israel's seemingly unstoppable political, diplomatic and territorial march, it’s remarkable that the Palestinian voice is heard at all.

June 12, Monday 7:45 am. The dilemma of 'moderate Amercian Muslims; following ReclaimNY , a child of Steve Bannon and Robert Mercer.

May 1, Workers Day, 7:45 am WBAI 99.5 fm. BN Aziz highlights the rise of the 'gig economy' and what it means for workers rights. Also: a reflection on free speech on American campuses when Berkeley students opppose right-wing media personalities.

April 24, 7:45 WBAI 99.5 fm. A check on our progress as American Muslims in the spotlight. Then her report from Lynne Stewart's April 22nd memorial in NYC:  Lynne, the Peoples' Lawyer. 

See Ramzy Baroud's assessment on how our Muslim community misuses celebrity Muslims as surrogates for their own stuggle.

 

Monday April 17 7:45 am, 99.5 fm on WBAI Radio, NYC. Why is there essential no anti-war movement in the USA? BNAziz raises this question with host MG Haskins, then offers her doubts about the authenticity of the US backed White Helmets, the award-winning.Syrian humanitarian agency.

April 10;  A critical look at media coverage of the US assault on Syria; and an update on ReclaimNY.

B. Nimri Aziz continues her weekly radio commentary on events around the globe and in the USA. Listen in at 99.5 fm, or online www.wbai.org where we are livestreamed.

 

"We are more alike than we are different"

  Maya Angelou

March 8, Women's Day Radio Specials  10-11 am on WJFF Radio, 90.5 fm, and 11:am on WBAI, 99.5 New York: B. Nimri Aziz interviews director Amber Fares about her new film "Speed Sisters" --a profile of 5 Palestinian car racers. Orther segments are from 2009-2010 interviews with professional women in Damascus Syria, Nadia Khost and Nidaa Al-Islam.

 

 

As a Black writer, I was expected to accept the role of victim. That made it difficult in the beginning to be a writer.      James Baldwin

I often feel that there must have been something that I should’ve done that I didn’t do. But I can’t identify what it is that I didn’t do. That’s the first difficulty. And the second is, what makes you think you’re it?   

         Harry Belafonte, activist and singer at 89

 

It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble; It's what you know for sure that just ainst so.

Mark Twain

 

You can't be brave if you've only had wonderful things happen to you.

Mary Tyler Moore

 

 You can’t defend Christianity by being against refugees and other religions

Pope Francis:

 

"I don't have to be what you want me to be". Muhammad Ali

 

"The Secret of Living Well and Longer: eat half, walk double, laugh triple, and love without measure"  attributed to Tibetan sources

 

 

 

Recent audio posts include interviews with Rumi interpreter Shahram Shiva, London-based author Aamer Hussein, South African Muslim scholar, professor Farid Esack, and Iraqi journalist Nermeen Al-Mufti's brief account of Kirkuk City history. Your comments on our blogs are always welcome.

 

 

 

Select Books

The Future of the Mind

by Michio Kaku, scientist and talk-radio host
Reviewed by BN Aziz

I’ve decided to learn as much as I can about brain physics. No, I haven’t been diagnosed with a frightening disease. I’m reading “The Future of the Mind” by Michio Kaku.

Kaku, besides being a renowned theoretical physicist and teacher, is someone with whom I shared an affection for radio, and the airwaves of 99.5 fm. in New York. We both hosted our weekly programs at WBAI Radio; he still hosts “Exploration” airing 2-3 p.m. Saturdays which is now widely syndicated.

One of the first journalistic science programs of its kind, “Exploration” on WBAI was initially a forum to expose the dangers of nuclear power and to advocate anti-nuclear policies. It grew into a review of cutting edge science, where Kaku spoke directly with researchers and took listeners’ questions by phone.

The best way to make science comprehensible is through public dialogues like “Exploration”; it was surely the foundation of Kaku’s emergence as a leading popularizer of science. Reading “The Future of the Mind”, we see how Kaku’s interviews with fellow scientists connected an enormous range of research. In his latest book, he credits more than 200 scientists (many over WBAI airwaves) he interviewed.

In 2001, Kaku expanded his reach, hosting “Parallel Universes”, a BBC television series on the cosmos. (His books had already attracted public attention: “Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and the Tenth Dimension”, and “Visions: How Science Will Revolutionize the 21st Century and Beyond” were followed in 2008 by the even more daring “Physics of the Impossible”.) As his influence grew and he is a frequent guest on mainstream television, Kaku remains anchored in radio.

Kaku can make the fantastic (but not impossible) intellectually appealing to the average person; and if he inspires me to learn more about my brain, imagine how young people respond.

Although we will doubtless hear much more from this brilliant physicist/journalist, Kaku’s “The Future of the Mind” may represent the zenith of a career that integrates disparate fields of research and demonstrates commonality between the laws of physics, the cosmos, and the human brain.

Kaku is certainly daring, defining the fuzzy line between science fiction and what’s “possible”. As a child, he says, he was inspired by Sci-Fi books and films. It seems this continues into his career as a theoretical physicist and author; he frequently invokes fantastic events we’ve witnessed in popular Sci-Fi films.

In his introduction to this latest bestseller, Kaku writes: “There are 100 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy, roughly the same as the number of neurons in our brain. You may have to travel 24 trillion miles to the first star outside our solar system to find an object as complex as what is sitting on your shoulders. The mind and the universe pose the greatest scientific challenge of all… one is concerned with the vastness of outer space, the other with inner space..the mind...”  Among other things this book demonstrates how “the universe and the mind continue to intersect...” Wow!



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When you learn, teach; when you get, give.

quoted by poet Maya Angelou

Paul Laurence Dunbar

Tahrir Diwan

a poem.. a song..
poem "The Poem of Iraq", Arabic
read by Bushra Bustani, poet and Professor of Arabic Literature, Mosel University

See poems and songs list

Flash
poems
poem "Ramadan"
AbdalHayy Moore reads from 'Ramadan Sonnets' --www.danielmoorepoetry.com

See audio list

Book review
Yousry Nasrallah, Director, Egypt's
Scheherazade: Tell Me A Story
reviewed by BN Aziz.

See review list

Tahrir Team

Hassen Abdellah
Read about Hassen Abdellah in the team page.

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